Tag Archives: laminitis

My pony has problems breathing and is extending his legs while walking and trotting. Any ideas?

Question: My pony suddenly started to breathe hard and extends his legs while trotting and walking. Is this normal? What should I do? This is not normal for him.

Answer from April Reeves: This is typical of a horse/pony in the beginning stages of laminitis. It is crucial that you have a vet out immediately. Laminitis comes first before founder, and once your pony passes into the founder stages, it’s not easy to bring a horse/pony back, if ever, once the coffin bone rotates and drops.

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Can you have Marijke van de Water give us some information on laminitis and Metabolic syndrome, in regards to feeding?

Marijke speaking at Farm Fair 08A SPECIAL REPORT FROM MARIJKE VAN DE WATER, B.Sc., DHMS

Healing Laminitis & Metabolic Syndrome with Nutrition
A complex condition and number two cause of death in horses, laminitis is related to the over-feeding of grass and grain and is actually a metabolic disease that affects the laminellar tissue; specialized tissue that ensures the structural integrity of the hoof by adhering the coffin bone to the inner hoof wall. Because of the highly vascular nature of the horse’s hoof it is extremely susceptible to inflammation and damage especially from digestive toxicity resulting from the over-feeding of starches and sugars. The lamina becomes stressed from high blood sugar levels as well as leaky gut syndrome where the bacteria, acids, and toxins migrate from the hindgut to the hoof initiating damage. Once the laminar tissue becomes weakened the connection between the hoof wall and coffin bone separates causing pain and inflammation. If left unchecked the coffin bone eventually drops – at which point it is labeled as founder.

The three major factors that trigger laminitis as caused by the feeding of high starch grains, and grass and hay which are high in sugars are: Continue reading

Wheat bran or rice bran? Which should I feed my horse?

Horse eating hay - a good source of fibre and energyQuestion: Which bran has a better laxative quality – wheat or rice? I was told that rice bran is a better choice for horses. Which has the higher fibre? Can I feed it for additional fibre?

Answer from April Reeves with excerpts from Marijke van de Water: I hate to burst your bubble, but neither wheat nor rice bran is a laxative to the horse. I am curious why you need a laxative product? If your horse is having problems with constipation, adding any bran to the equation will have little to no effect. It’s important to understand the cause of your horse’s problem and solve that first.

While both brans have great fibre content, feeding hay will also get you the fibre your horse needs. There is no need to feed bran for fibre. Bran has many more advantages than just fibre.

I will give you a few excerpts from Marijke van de Water’s book, “Healing Horses Their Way” so that you may make an educated decision on which is the right one for your horse.

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What exactly is laminitis and how can you treat it?

A SPECIAL POST BY MARIJKE VAN DE WATER, B.Sc., DHMS

Question: I was told last week that my horse had laminitis. The vet did explain some things but now I’m searching desperately to find out if she will live or be put down. Also what can she take to help her? How did she get this?

Answer from Marijke van de Water: A complex condition and number two cause of death in horses, laminitis is related to the over-feeding of grass and grain, and is actually a metabolic disease that affects the laminellar tissue; specialized tissue that ensures the structural integrity of the hoof by adhering the coffin bone to the inner hoof wall. Because of the highly vascular nature of the horse’s hoof it is extremely susceptible to inflammation and damage especially from digestive toxicity resulting from the over-feeding of starches and sugars. The lamina becomes stressed from high blood sugar levels as well as leaky gut syndrome where the bacteria, acids, and toxins migrate from the hindgut to the hoof initiating damage. Once the laminar tissue becomes weakened the connection between the hoof wall and coffin bone separates causing pain and inflammation. If left unchecked the coffin bone eventually drops – at which point it is labeled as founder.

The three major factors that trigger laminitis as caused by the feeding of high starch grains, and grass and hay which are high in sugars are:

Continue reading